The Transformation Journey from an Idea to its Ongoing Operational Success

By David Winders and Kirill Deverenski. October 2018

The last ten years have shown great promise in operational change with new and different ways of communicating how a business should be structured to deliver value to its stakeholders. Materials have moved away from stuffy journals and methods, often kept under lock and key by transformation consultancies, to bright simple and vibrant books and materials.

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On Importance of Information and Technology in the Operating Model Design

By David Winders and Kirill Deverenski. September 2018

This article concludes the series in which we have explored the six domains presented in the 2016 book Operating Model canvas. The purpose was to expand on each area and give some advice on how to populate each one with particular emphasis on linkage to value.

Information represents how the operating model considers the management of technology, information and data. In most cases this equates to information technology; it is interesting to note that in the past some organisations used to refer to their IT as IS (Information Systems) or even IS&T (Information Systems & Technology) so this Information domain clearly makes sense.

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Form That Follows Function – Physical Organisation and the Operating Model

By David Winders and Kirill Deverenski. July 2018

In this series of articles we have explored each zone or theme of the Operating Model Canvas in order to provide better guidance on how to use the themes to describe the operating model.

The main message that has been presented in this series is that the operating model should be based on maximising the value provided to the client of the firm. In other words, “we need to design the operation to deliver the most value in the most efficient way”. In many cases, it is a balance between providing the most value against the financial impact of doing so (whether in costs or revenues) where compromises have to be made; this has been seen in several of the preceding articles. Physical organisation is no different.

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On Importance of Location in Operating Model Design

By David Winders and Kirill Deverenski. June 2018

Despite the recent profound changes in globalisation reach, management science and cultural awareness, location is perhaps one of the operating model areas of interest that is often taken for granted and not challenged during the process of operating model design and implementation.

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Charting Supplier Relationships in the Operating Model Design

by: David Winders and Kirill Deverenski. April 2018

In our earlier articles we have looked at the Value Delivery Chains and how to identify and heatmap the necessary prerequisites for its successful delivery. Here we are focusing on the all-important supplier relationships that any organisation will need to put in place to succeed.

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Heat-mapping value: Identifying where to invest effort for Operating Model Design

By: Kirill Derevenski & David Winders March 2018

In the earlier article we spoke about placing value delivery chains at the heart of a Target Operating Model. We continue in this post with clear identification of necessary prerequisites for subsequent detailed operating model design using the Operating Model Canvas methodology.

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Putting value delivery chains at the heart of a Target Operating Model

by Kirill Derevenski & David Winders February 2018

An optimal Target Operating Model (TOM) is a representation – and a concrete realisation – of how an organisation is best structured to deliver maximal value to its beneficiaries. It contains a number of clearly defined and described elements – organisational makeup, supplier relationships, location mapping, information flows, decision grids and management systems – all composed in the best way to optimise value delivery chains to intended recipients.

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